JUR page loader
Launching the World’s First Multi-jurisdiction ODR Platform
3 min read
Zug, 28th July 2020 Dear Community, After months of work and preparation, despite the COVID phase, we are really excited to publicly announce the Open Justice Platform. Originally named as the “Court Layer” in our whitepaper, the solution will be addressing a global problem in a radically new way, a use case made even more urgent by the COVID pandemic.  Let’s build the future of justice. The platform's initial release is scheduled for the end of Q3 of this year. This announcement has a different structure than the usual ones. Our goal is to give you a first overview of the context, reasons, and strategy of this release. More detailed information will be published over the next 3 months. Justice, as a multi-sided global problem In every country on the planet, the average time needed for getting one first instance judgment and its enforcement takes 600 days and costs around 25% of the value of the dispute. This is a sub-optimal situation today that most of us accept despite the huge losses it creates in terms of GDP, not to mention the human suffering that is associated with these injustices. This negative situation is getting even further enhanced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The dimension of the justice problem The Justice problem is global, multi-sided, and fragmented. It is not easy to estimate the size of this problem. Taking the UK jurisdiction as a reference, a recent analysis addressed some of these numbers and they are appalling. A similar approach could be taken for every other jurisdiction as well. Alongside our academic partners, we will be analyzing the data in a deeper way but it’s reasonable to say that the dimension of the problem is in order of several trillions per year (yes, you read that right). World’s first multi-jurisdiction Online Dispute Resolution.  What we propose:  A globally accessible and reliable judge for civil and commercial disputes. In  36 months from now, we want to have at least one Hub (i.e. Online Arbitration Chamber) in each one of 166 Countries where the legal framework we use is applicable (UNCITRAL Model Law). 30/60 days justice. Each Hub ensures dispute resolution of any kind (preferably targeting disputes under 1M USD value) in 30-60 days. In more complex cases (when technical consultancies are needed) it can take more. The digitalization of the process cuts the time and simplifies the bureaucracy. Affordable. The cost of this procedure is around 5% of the value of the dispute. This means that for a dispute of 100K USD of value, one or both of the parties pay 5K USD and in 30 days have a legally binding decision (an arbitration award). A unique global standard. Our model is made for being the same wherever you are. As an example, the Uber experience is roughly the same in Bangalore or in Rome or in Dubai. The car might change but the efficiency and reliability of the service is the same. A better equilibrium. In the last twelve months, we spoke with dozens of stakeholders at all levels (mostly policymakers, lawyers, arbitrators, legal counsels, CLOs, CEOs). We found an incredible response and we think that with our solution everyone gets advantaged. Governments reduce the problem of backlog in public courts. Lawyers are empowered to be more efficient. Current arbitration chambers might expand their reach to target more services that are currently uncovered. Decentralized in the features. The full trial is 100% online and enhanced in critical points by blockchain. For example, given a specific pool of arbitrators selected according to expertise, the selection is randomly generated through a DLT-based algorithm that ensures truly random selection. A peer-review system for providing, in case of need, an internal second step (or revision) of judgment and objective ongoing quality assessment of each. Advanced rating system to assess the quality/reputation of every single arbitrator, guaranteed thanks to a decentralized assessment mechanism that leverages game theory. Micro-Justice. We will keep expanding the work done on the Jur Beta Platform as R&D for addressing micro-sized claims that are not currently addressed in any way worldwide (e.g. disputes of 100 USD). Road to decentralization. We believe that in a 10-20 year timeframe new decentralized models and crypto-business models will be the leading ones. We think that justice is one sector that will benefit from decentralization. We are thrilled about the new milestone ahead and delighted to finally announce this. Stay tuned for more upcoming news! Don’t forget to check out the new landing page of the Open Justice Platform:

Join our community

Subscribe to the Jur newsletter to get a monthly update on our ecosystem and how interesting insights on our products.
The Smart Guide to Legaltech Terms for Blockchain
Blockchain and legaltech have been on a collision-course for years.. This is bringing together two segments of society that weren’t all that well-acquainted in the past. Having trouble with some of the terms? Here’s a quick overview of some commonly used words from both the legal and blockchain space. Happy reading! The potential applications of blockchain technology to legal services are numerous. Below are some of the most common ones. Enter in the legaltech world with us! Let’s start with the basics: A glossary of Legaltech cannot start without mentioning: Smart Contract: a program that automatically executes a contract when triggered by a specified events. This is like a digital vending machine — if the pre-determined condition (in this case, a coin is put into the machine) is met, the vending machine releases control of an asset (in this case, a can of Pepsi). Smart contracts can be executed on a blockchain platform, like VeChain. The traditional vending machine is a smart contract early-adopter. Smart Legal Contracts: Self-executing agreements with terms and conditions traceable on an immutable blockchain. Smart legal contract platforms (eg. Jur, Openlaw, Clause) take more traditional legal contracts and automate them using code. https://youtu.be/tGsuRj_rkGk Decentralized: Lacking any centralized server or agency, significantly reducing the risk of breaches caused by bad actors, hacks or natural disasters.Blockchain: A decentralized, immutable ledger is used to record data or transactions across many computers, making data written to the chain transparent and permanent.dApps: A decentralized application, usually using a blockchain as part of their core product.Consensus: The agreement of all participants of the network on the validity of something. This is an important part of blockchains, as the method of consensus affects how secure, efficient, costly, and decentralized a platform is. If 51% consensus is reached, a Bitcoin transaction is considered valid. Now that we have that under control, let’s move on to some more advanced terminology: ADR (and ODR): Alternate Dispute Resolution platforms (and Online Dispute Resolution) replace the role of courts in mediation processes. They can act as a third-party to make a decision on a dispute and distribute contested funds via smart contracts (eg. Jur, Kleros).Litigation funding (or legal financing): In the current legal system, people hoping to fund high-profile lawsuits can receive funding from firms or groups of people hoping to earn interest on any damages received from a successful ruling. Tokenisation (making a product, asset, security, or liability into a token on the blockchain)enables plaintiffs to crowdsource litigation funding and automate the repayment of financing (eg. Jur).Trust accounting: A smart escrow ‘locks up’ digital assets so no party can access it until it released by a defined trigger event. The “power of attorney” can now become digital and transparent. This is how the Jur Beta Platform works. Evidence: Users can trace digital documents or media for evidence of contract versioning or proof of prior ownership (eg. Blocknotary).Certification: Institutions can issue certificates for bar qualifications and university degrees which can be verified by anyone. (eg. Blockcert).Paper documents: Important documents like property deeds can be stored on the blockchain, preventing loss or destruction (eg. Lantmateriet).Pro bono: Tokenised reward systems incentivize pro bono (free) legal work for low income or disadvantaged clients (eg. Legaler Aid).Fractional asset ownership: Token ownership makes it possible to “crowdsource” ownership of real-world assets like real estate or fine art (eg. Blocksquare).Predictive justice: Applications that use big data and AI to compare acurrent scenario to a database of previous court decisions and output a chance of success. Minority Report was a movie based on the idea of ‘predictive justice’ Computational Law: The capability of computers to automate some aspects of the law, particularly judicial decision making.Document analysis: A data collection technique that evaluates documents, grouping together key words and important pieces of information.Digital Signature: a mathematical or cryptographic method of presenting the authenticity of digital assets.Digital identity: online identity adopted by either a person or an electronic device.Application Programming Interface (API): A gateway to a program, protocol, or operating system. This makes it easy for other applications or users to “use” or integrate the application (e.g. logging into a third-party website using Facebook or Google account details). Jur’s API will allow other platforms to integrate parts of our decentralized legal ecosystem for easier adoption. That’s all for now! Use the knowledge just learned to get a better understanding of the nascent legaltech industry and help us building the legal decentralized ecosystem. Do you want to follow all the updates about Jur?
IE University in Spain to join hands with Jur and the Lab For New Justice by Launching the ‘Smart Contract Competition’
After the first edition at Radboud University Faculty of Law, Nijmegen, and immediately following the beginning of the Lab for New Justice at Hull University, Jur is launching the ‘Smart Contract Competition’ with IE University, in Segovia (Spain). Students from the acclaimed private University in Spain will be able to work hands-on in the creation of smart legal contracts and experience the entire flow of Jur’s online dispute resolution system. IE University, Spain The competition will be held starting from the 18th of February 2020, over four dates, lead by professor Francisco de Elizalde, full-time Professor at IE University, Law School: Day 1 — Tuesday, 18th FebruaryDay 2 — Tuesday, 25th FebruaryDay 3 — Tuesday, 24th March // date updatedDay 4 — Tuesday, 31st March // date updated The four meetings will take a deep dive into the main concepts and practice of dealing with ODR — Online Dispute Resolution systems — on the blockchain. Luigi Cantisani, legal engineer, and Michele D’Asaro, R&D will lead the meetings at IE University and will touch topics widely ranging from blockchain, use of smart contracts and game theory, which is the underlying framework for the Jur Beta Platform’s dispute resolution system. The poster used by the IE University to call for the Smart Contract Competition The Lab for New Justice’s educational offer has been welcomed, with IE University by the third university in Europe now, after Radboud’s Faculty of Law and Hull’s Business and Law department began leading the way. Jur’s team is extremely honoured for having aroused such interest in the Academic sector; an important step towards a scientific approach in the development of the decentralized legal app (dApp) by Jur. “The Smart contracts competition entails a unique opportunity to instil in our students the skills that lawyers will require to succeed in a highly-developed technological environment. Professor Francisco de Elizalde, full-time Professor at IE University, Law School A hands-on experience on smart contracts and blockchain technology will also enhance a normative reflection on how law and technology should interact” — Professor Francisco de Elizalde, full-time Professor at IE University, Law School - he concludes. Francisco De Elizalde | IE UniversityFrancisco de Elizalde is a full-time Professor at IE University, Law School. He focuses on Private Law, especially…www.ie.edu Smart legal contracts enable a more efficient and transparent relationship between parties. In Jur, we try to bring contracts to life automating core clauses ensuring they become auditable and as self-enforceable as possibleLuca Daniel, CTO of Jur The Lab For New Justice is the initiative held by Jur to research over the dispute resolution methods and carry out testing on the Jur Beta Platform. Jur is currently releasing the second edition, after the first was carried at Radboud University, Nijmegen, under the supervision of Profs. Andre Janssen and Pietro Ortolani. IE University offers a technology-based learning ecosystem for people who make a difference in the world through innovation, global vision, an entrepreneurial mentality and a unique focus on the humanities. IE University has a staff of more than 500 professors who currently teach university diplomas, master, doctoral, and training programmes and executive training to students in 131 countries. The platform of over 60,000 alumni of IE University is located in 165 countries. Professor Francisco de Elizalde, which leads the Smart Contract Competition at IE University, is a full-time Professor at IE University, Law School. He focuses on Private Law, especially Contracts and the Law of Property. He is a permanent Visiting Professor at Koç University (Turkey) and has lectured as visiting at City University of Hong Kong, FGV Sao Paulo (Brazil) and the Law Schools Global League. Do you want to follow all the updates about Jur?