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Jur Delivers a Professional Certificate Course with Mumbai Centre for International Arbitration
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On 21st and 22nd of November 2020, the Mumbai Centre For International Arbitration in collaboration with Jur delivered a Professional Certificate Course on blockchain, smart contracts and online dispute resolution. The course was designed to teach professionals how blockchain and smart contracts technology work, and demonstrate their use cases in the world of dispute resolution. On completion of the course, participants received a professional certificate from the widely-respected MCIA.  Page 1 of the Professional Certificate Course on blockchain, smart contracts and online dispute resolution program Since its inception, MCIA has been spearheading its efforts in creating, supporting and promoting innovations in arbitration. This Certificate course in Blockchain and Smart Contract, in collaboration with Jur, was MCIA’s endeavour to draw on the latest innovations in the area of Legal tech to equip the arbitration professionals in these specialised skills. The course was very well attended and saw participation from senior professionals of the arbitration community. MCIA looks forward to hosting many more such courses in the future.Neeti Sachdeva, Secretary General and Registrar at Mumbai Centre For International Arbitration This is the first of Jur's initiatives that are meant for professionals. It has been built on the insights provided by the recent successful programs for students that were hosted by institutions such as Radboud University, IE University and University of Hull. After listening to lectures providing an overview of blockchain technology and smart contracts, the participants created their own smart legal contracts to represent traditional legal agreements with the guidance of the experts from Jur.  I am thrilled by the professional certificate course that we have put together with MCIA. These initiatives help spread awareness of blockchain and smart contracts in the legal industry and specifically in the ADR space. Thanks to our daily hands on experience we can provide practical knowledge that very few can offer so I am sure further educational activities of this sort will continue in the future.Luca Daniel, CTO at Jur Page 2 of the Professional Certificate Course on blockchain, smart contracts and online dispute resolution program Mumbai Centre expert Madhvendra Singh,  a chartered engineer, blockchain professional, senior member of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and an international arbitrator facilitated the session. Jur team members Raffaele Battaglini, CLO, Luigi Cantisani, legal engineer, and Shuchi Tyagi, smart contract and blockchain developer, presented information. Jur CTO Luca Yesupatham Daniel moderated the final Q&A session with participants. There is a tremendous spurt in activity in the areas of Legal Tech and ODR in India. I see that major stakeholders in this sector, acknowledge the disruption that technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Blockchain & Smart Contracts are likely to bring, and therefore seek to learn about them. MCIA & Jur together have done a Yeoman service by curating such an intelligent training program for the professionals, and engagement by the participants of this maiden course is testament to that fact. We must endeavour to train, and facilitate professionals to grow, to be able to meet the challenges of the future.Madhvendra Singh, FCIArb, Chartered Engineer, Maritime Arbitrator Professionals participating in the course, such as arbitrators, future arbitrators and attorneys, learned about the latest technological developments that will shape the future of the legal industry and how these technologies will disrupt the legal profession. Get in contact if you wish to learn more about our professional courses or you wish to collaborate with us. We are developing the first multi-jurisdiction online dispute resolution platform, the Open Justice Platform. Learn more.

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Jur Selected By OECD As Representative of the Startup Legal Tech Ecosystem
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Blockchain Policy Centre is launching the Global Blockchain Policy Forum to identify ways to use distributed ledger technology (DLT) to solve public policy problems.  Jur is happy to announce that the OECD has selected Jur to participate in the forum along with 17 other startups.  The OECD 2020 Global Blockchain Policy Forum is the leading international event focused on the public policy implications of distributed ledger technology. This event will provide an opportunity for the Jur team to explain the Open Justice Platform, an online dispute resolution platform that is legally binding in 166 jurisdictions, to a wide audience of  stakeholders that focus on the policy implications of blockchain and other distributed technologies, and discuss current ideas and upcoming issues with senior-level policymakers and industry experts. In their evaulation, the OECD’s committee has recognized the positive impact that the Open Justice Platform can bring to small and medium enterprises and professionals across the world by increasing access to justice, thus removing friction created by distrust and uncertainty that currently slows the economy. In addition to the OECD’s recognition, Jur has earned the attention of other groups with the power and ambition to change the legal landscape, including LawtechUK, a UK government-backed organization that recently chose Jur as the delivery partner for their Dispute Resolution Platform initiative. The forum will take place on 16-20 November 2020 as a Virtual Interactive Event running from 1pm - 5.30pm Paris time each day. The entire event will be streamed online and access is free.  Participants in the forum will discuss the leading applications and significant policy issues confronting the blockchain ecosystem in 2020, including asset tokenization, central bank digital currencies, and self-sovereign identity. It will review the emerging policy responses, including the recent work of the OECD, share best practices identified across the world, look ahead to emerging trends in the blockchain industry, and hear from stakeholders on how policy can best support viable and fit-for-purpose innovation and adoption of distributed ledger technologies. This is the 3rd edition of the forum, following the 2018 and 2019 editions. The 2019 edition took place on 12-13 September 2019 and welcomed more than 1600 participants, while convening more than 200 high-level speakers across over 50 sessions.  https://youtu.be/dbVj2vW226Y As in previous years, the forum will focus on assessing the development of blockchain over the past year and delving into some of the specific challenges to implementation and adoption, discussing emerging policy responses, sharing best practices identified in public blockchain initiatives across the world and investigating uses of blockchain in specific policy areas, highlighting the work of the OECD and other stakeholders. Previous conferences have devoted much of their proceedings to the regulatory challenges created by blockchain technology. But while this new technology poses potential new problems, it also offers potential novel solutions to old problems. This year, Jur’s presentation of the Open Justice Platform will demonstrate the potential of blockchain technology to offer new solutions to long-standing policy problems. You can register to the entire event for free at: https://oecd-events.org/blockchainforum%20/registration/register Let us know if you will participate, on Twitter!
Jur’s Solutions are brought into the Academics
Ludovica Troili is a trainee lawyer, recently graduated at the University of Roma Tre in Law with a thesis in International Arbitration. Her work, entitled “International Arbitration and the challenges with the new technologies”, focuses on smart contracts and the lack of a dispute resolution method. That’s why she dedicated the last chapter of her thesis to Jur’s online courts. This article has been written by Ludovica Troili. As someone passionate about International Arbitration, after having deepened it both at a theoretical and practical level, I was looking for an innovative topic to develop in my thesis project. During my research, I came across a conference organized by the Court of Appeal in Rome regarding the impact of new technologies on ADR systems, thus, from that moment, I have made my decision. If my initial goal was to explore the new frontiers of arbitration, I, finally, found myself studying blockchain technologies and, then analysing what may be their potential impact in the legal area. This has been the main question that I have tried to answer through my thesis. Hence, it is now necessary to take a step back to explain how I got there. At first, as a beginner in the blockchain world, I devoted myself to unbridled research, by the means of books, manuals and every document on the subject available and participation in conferences, seminars, and events on the subject. During this period, I had the opportunity to debate the topic with numerous experts in various fields: mainly, (i) the professional used to employ the blockchain technologies in his/her daily activity; (ii) the student/post-graduate with a passion for this “new” economic system; (iii) the engineer or the computer technician involved with the language code and all its potentialities; (iv) the lawyer with a focus firmly directed towards the future. At the end of my research, the most relevant aspect I have found was the high percentage of leading experts in new technologies and blockchain, all sharing a total lack of interest and consideration for the impact that the operations undertook with these technologies could have on a legal level. As a legal specialist, I find it impossible to exercise any kind of business activity, without the awareness of the aspects and the legal implications connected with it. Therefore, once noted all those people who used to implement their activities through the blockchain technologies – without any regard to the legal protection that they could have had nor to the legal consequences that these operations which implemented in the virtual world could have had in the physical world –  has made it imperative to me to study a solution to overcome this significant gap. The latter represented, later on, the very heart of my thesis project. At the end of this path, I found myself with the handing over of my Paper, while at the same time, the COVID-19 began to expand world-wide, with the result that, in the middle of the pandemic, I graduated online in mid-March. This degree has been a clear demonstration of how such a dramatic situation has brought everyone, even the most reticent ones, closer to the daily use of technology. What was once perceived as an option has become a need, and in the past weeks, as a legal specialist, I have been able to analyse how such a need was felt within the legal area. In Italy, both many judicial and extra-judicial bodies have made a significant effort to implement remote hearings and, further, most law firms have facilitated the possibility to hold meetings in videoconference. All of these to sum up to the sponsorship of a huge number of webinars that are spreading on the Internet, in order to promote the running of distance conventions and seminars. Everyone is striving to avoid that the isolation and social distancing do not also involve immobilization of the life of each one. It is hoped that such a motivation to eliminate the distance between the legal area and technological evolution would work as a starting point for an even closer future collaboration between these two worlds. In this regard, in my thesis project – based on the convergence between these two areas – I analysed the advent of blockchain technologies and its legal implications. More specifically, the purpose is the one to deepen the issue of smart contracts and the lack of a dispute resolution mechanism, proposing, then, International Arbitration. The subject is introduced through an overview of the definition of blockchain technologies and, especially, smart contracts, dealing with their main features, functions, and practical application. After highlighting the technical characteristics of the said tools, the Paper shifts to their legal evaluation. As a result, doubts arise with regard to the legal nature of smart contracts, by leading, inevitably, to significant uncertainty about their jurisdiction and the suitable method for settling disputes. Given the numerous different views on such issues, a possible solution can be found in the figure of smart legal contracts, a hybrid version of smart contracts, where both the human language form and the code form of a single contract are combined and anchored within a valid legal framework. It is, in fact, a traditional contract able to be executed entirely or partially by a machine, the contracting parties will thus be able to take advantage of the automatic performance through the smart contract, having, at the same time, a traditional version of the contract which expresses in detail the agreed terms and conditions. Against this background, the Paper suggests the applicability of International Arbitration as the perfect candidate to facilitate the settlement of transnational disputes arising from such kinds of “digital agreements”. In this way, it would be possible to overcome all the above-mentioned doubts though a neutral procedure, supported by a body of legal experts specialised in the present field, with a flexible procedure tailor-made by the parties, and, finally, characterized by the binding character of the final decision taken by the Arbitral Tribunal, recognizable and executable in more than 160 countries. Follow Ludovica on Linkedin In the last chapter of the thesis, in order to provide a practical representation of what has been said on a theoretical level, I reported the case study of Jur, a platform based on blockchain technology, which enables, firstly, every kind of users (even the ones with zero knowledge in legal / tech matters) to create smart contracts and initiate activities on the network, supported by technical and legal experts all around the world, secondly, it grants the parties to choose over three different ways to solve every eventual conflict, according to their needs (Open Layer; Community Layer; Court Layer)*. The above describes the possibility to settle disputes, of any nature and size, in an online procedure implemented on the blockchain, by virtue of all its inherent advantages, such as the possibility to save costs and time, to process a large volume of data in a fraction of time with no margin of error, to securely implement the proceeding due to the high cybersecurity and cryptography, and to manage original and authentic legal documents, given the immutability of the platform. In view of the above considerations, the hope is that what right now has been implemented as an exception may, in the next future, be confirmed as the rule. [Editor’s note: Jur is currently developing a new platform, called Open Justice, that sums up the theory behind the above-mentioned Court Layer to provide a fast, reliable and completely online procedure for dispute resolution world-wide] *See Jur’s white paper for more information Do you want to follow all the updates about Jur?